Wednesday, January 25, 2012

The Witch Ball

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Ginger from Small Town, U.S.A. sent me a witch ball for Christmas.   It is so pretty, and I wanted to learn more about them.

The best site I found for information on the witch ball can be found here.  The site is called Sunny Reflections, and they have some pretty artwork

The Witch Ball is used for protection against evil spells, witches, negativity, sickness, and ill fortune.  Traditionally, Witch Balls are hung in an east window. However, any area around your home, whether in a window, porch, on a desk, or even outside in a garden, is a perfect spot to place a Witch Ball to ward off negative energy.  They were also the precursors to the gazing ball, which are traditionally solid with a reflective surface.  They reflect evil from our gardens.

Historically, Witch Balls have been around for over 600 years.  They were first molded into sloppy spherical shapes in the Medieval times to ward off witches, goblins, and evil spirits. During Victorian times, Witch Balls were molded in a more refined shape and used higher quality glass and were displayed to declare prestige and wealth.  The legend was discussed but regarded more as a superstition.  Today, Witch Balls have become perfected in their shape and variety of colors to display beautifully as artwork or decorations, the belief of their magic and the true legend behind them is left for you to decide!

Traditionally, witch balls are either blue or green, with strands of colored glass within them. They can be as large as seven inches in diameter, and the pretty colors and strands of glass inside attract evil spirits.  Once inside, the strands trap the spirits forever and they can no longer cause harm.

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Just in time for Valentine's Day, this is the Tree of Love Inspirational Ball is from Kitras.  Notice the strands of glass inside!


The first Christmas tree ornaments were actually witch balls.  Folks did not want their friends and neighbors to be jealous of all the presents under their trees, so witch balls were placed on the branches to dispel their envy.  I always find it interesting how pagan traditions and dates have been incorporated into the Christian calendar and traditions.  These traditions were started by the Roman Emperor Constantine during the fourth century and continue to this day.


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Ginger bought me a Kitras Art Glass Tree of Family ball.  This is what the card attached to the ball says:

"There is no greater comfort in life then the unconditional love and support of family. Like the roots of a tree, family nourishes and encourages us to grow to limitless possibilities. The Tree of Family reminds us that no matter how far we branch out as individuals, our family is always there for support, for encouragement, and above all, for love."


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I love the art of these balls, and I prefer the sentiment of the Inspiration Balls from the Kitras Company.  My Tree of Family ball is hanging in our kitchen.

Do you have a witch ball in your kitchen, or a gazing ball in your garden?  Were you aware of the history behind them?


Until next time...

Blessings!
Ricki Jill

14 comments:

  1. Che bello,ancora palle di natale!Baci,Rosetta

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  2. Very interesting, I love hearing the history of vintage items.

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  3. Oh that's beautiful! What a gorgeous gift to receive!
    I have never heard of witch balls....what an interesting story.

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  4. I am so jealous. I have always wanted one. I do have a gazing ball in my garden that Our Son bought me for Mothers Day years ago.

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  5. What a fabulous gift! I've never heard of them before but my husband knew exactly what it was. Such a fascinating and beautiful addition to a home ~ now on my 'wish list', thanks!
    ♥Sharon

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  6. What a beautiful gift.. Never heard of witch ball's, very interesting.. ;))Wishing you an amazing week...

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  7. The witch balls are absolutely gorgeous!! I too find it interesting how Pagan beliefs find their way into culture (like Halloween!). I'm not at all superstitious but I DO love pretty things!! LOL

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  8. I have witch balls in each window, I take no chances, they are beautiful, I love them,

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  9. I love this history lesson. I had no idea about their background. I just fell in love with their beauty and the "family" story of them. I hope you will enjoy your witches ball for many years and that it will keep all evil away from your door. It looks lovely in your kitchen. Hugs!

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  10. Great history story. It's always interesting to learn new things. It was news to me. I think it is a wonderful gift and I appreciate you sharing with your readers.

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  11. What a coincidence to see this post this morning! I have seen the BIG balls that people put outside, but this weekend, there were small balls in the planters where we stayed at the beach! They were gorgeous! I wondered where you find those! Great post! Sweet Ginger! ♥

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  12. I had no idea of the history, of course I have seen them, none around here. How sweet of Ginger, she's a nice lady! That is so cute that your daughter is going to guest host her dress form for the ball! Oh it will be so fun, is she old enough to drive or shall I send the carriage LOL?
    Carol

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  13. My daughter gave me one several years ago. I love it.

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I read and appreciate all of your comments :D